Recent News & Events

 
Scientists Develop New Medications in Much Less Time Using New Crystallographic Method
Mar
29
DSS
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a unique way to determine the crystal makeup of organic salts faster. Since salts make up about 40 percent of the active ingredients in medications, this new process can significantly accelerate the development of new pharmaceuticals. The new crystallographic method also decreases the effort that scientists put into that process which reduces development costs.
Engineering 3D Tissue - Controlling Complex Shapes In Vitro
Mar
08
DSS
As tissues develop, they fold, coil and ripple into complex shapes. After discovering more parallels between biology and technology, bioengineers at the University of California, San Francisco, found a relatively simple way to control tissue shapes in vitro. They can develop predetermined three-dimensional tissues by programming active mouse and human cells to extracellular matrix fibers.
New Microflow Measuring System to Improve Medical Research and Treatment
Feb
27
DSS
A new microflow measurement system that tracks the flow of very tiny amounts of liquids could have great implications for medical science, drug delivery and other biological fields. According to the provisional patent filed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the optical device is only as big as a nickel and can measure liquid movement in nanoliters per minute.
DeNovix is First Instrument Company Awarded the Platinum Seal of Quality
Feb
08
DSS
February 8th, 2018 (WILMINGTON, Delaware, USA) The DeNovix DS11 FX+ Spectrophotometer / Fluorometer Series has become the first life science instrument to receive the prestigious Platinum Seal of Quality by SelectScience.
 NIH Lifts Ban on Federally Funded Research of Deadly Viruses
Jan
18
DSS
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has lifted a ban on federal funding for precarious research that might develop more contagious and deadly viruses. The move comes just more than three years after U.S. officials issued a pause on such research funding. Alongside the lifted ban, however, the NIH announced a more tedious review process that research proposals must undergo prior to receiving federal grants.
A Proper Biosafety Training Program is a Must
Dec
07
DSS
A biosafety cabinet can be an essential tool for effective laboratory work. However, it is also essential that a complete biosafety program be implemented in any laboratory that uses a biosafety cabinet. A biosafety cabinet program can help ensure that users of the cabinet and those around it stay safe and uncontaminated while work is being done.
Neural Treatment May Restore Breathing in Patients With Spinal Cord Injuries
Nov
06
DSS
Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are very painful and have a high risk for causing paralysis. One of the most severe side effects is the inability to breathe without assistance. Using laboratory models, however, neuroscientists have discovered that two sets of neural signals control diaphragm movement. Through rodent testing, they may have found a drug that can restore diaphragm movement so that humans with SCIs can breathe without ventilation.
The CLARIOstar® With ACU Exposes Cells to Ischemia- Reperfusion Conditions and Monitors Their Oxygenation
Oct
26
DSS
The lack of oxygen supply is associated with a number of life-threatening diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or renal failure whereby cells are temporarily deprived of O2 and nutrient (ischemia). Significant cell damage can also occur during the reperfusion phase through oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Investigating these pathologies in vitro requires an experimental set-up capable of rapid deoxygenation, rapid reperfusion, and parallel monitoring of critical biological parameters including cellular oxygenation and ROS.
Oct
05
DSS

Cancer surgeons endeavor to remove all cancerous tissues from patients without removing the surrounding healthy tissue, but achieving that is more challenging than it sounds. To facilitate this goal, engineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a gentle, handheld mass spectrometry pen. In just seconds, it can accurately detect whether or not tissue is cancerous.

Benefits of Controlled Rate Freezing
Sep
27
DSS
The Controlled-Rate freezing process preserves cells at negative 112 or negative 321 degrees Fahrenheit. These ultra-low temperatures slow or stop biological activity. Controlling the freezing rate allows scientists to remove water from the cells and preserve them in a way that improves sample viability.
Scientists May Have Found a Way to Reverse Age-Related Hearing Loss
Sep
12
DSS
Based on mice research, scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital theorize that adults lose this ability because of a chemical in the brain. By restricting that chemical, they made auditory learning more efficient in adult mice. The research findings could lead to treatments that reverse age-related hearing loss in humans.
Cerebral Organoids May Help Scientists Better Understand Mental Impairments and Disorders
Aug
24
DSS
Scientists believe that cerebral organoids are the key to learning how the brain works and develops diseases. These clusters of tissue allow them to watch neurons grow and function in labs. This could change how they understand basic brain activity and the causes of brain impairments and disorders from autism to schizophrenia.
Vaccines Containing Genes Could Offer Advantages in Preventing Infectious Diseases
Aug
10
DSS
Vaccines for infectious diseases contain weak or dead proteins or pathogens from the disease-causing microorganisms. The vaccines that fight cancer rely on proteins as well. However, scientists have created a new type of vaccine that contains genes and is expected to offer several advantages over its standard predecessor. After decades of research, genomic vaccines are being used in clinical trials.
Membraneless Organelles Could Help Scientists Better Understand Incurable Diseases
Jul
25
DSS
Princeton University and Washington University engineers have collaborated to create a new way to study the material structure of membraneless organelles and observe how they work. Their research could have a myriad of scientific applications and help scientists better understand incurable diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS, Huntington's disease and cancers.
Is Patient Organoid Testing the Future of Prescription Medicine?
Jul
12
DSS
Researchers used Organoids to learn how the Zika virus affects developing brains. With that, and other successes they've had working with organoids, researchers believe that they can use organoids to determine whether or not a drug will work on a patient by patient basis. In the cases where this technology is being used in trials, several insurers have started covering expensive prescriptions that would have been denied otherwise.
Mycoplasma Contamination: The Problem and Prevention for Grant-Funded Research
Jun
29
DSS
Cell lines are important research tools, and contamination with microorganisms is one of the most common concerns. The cell lines need to be authentic to provide the most reliable results. This is why many grants require researchers to test cell lines for mycoplasma contamination.
Fruit Fly Study Finds That Gut Microbes Influence Food Choice and Behavior.
Jun
16
DSS
In a study of fruit flies, neuroscientists found that the gut microbiome communicates with the brain and influences food choices. The microbiome is a community of bacteria that's present in all animals, including humans. Many studies have shown that microbes affect health and biological pathways such as appetite and immunity.
Synthetic Bone Implant Produces Blood Cells and Improves Blood and Immune Disorder Research and Treatment
May
30
DSS
Patients with bone marrow diseases can get bone marrow transplants. However, this treatment method usually causes uncomfortable and damaging side effects such as fatigue, nausea and fertility loss. To improve the treatment of blood and immune disorders, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have engineered a synthetic bone implant that resembles real bone and produces healthy, functional blood.
No Batteries Required? Researchers Unveil Biological Supercapacitor That Powers Battery-Free Pacemakers With the Human Body
May
18
DSS

Technologies for medical implants continue to evolve at a fast pace. Pacemakers are one example of an implant that just keeps getting smaller. However, we still have to use traditional batteries to power them. This is why researchers have revealed a "biological supercapacitor" that uses the human body to power battery-free pacemakers and other medical implants that can potentially last a lifetime.

NIH Funding Estimates (Billions) for Research, Condition, and Disease Categories (RCDC)
Apr
25
DSS
Check out the 2017 National Institutes of Health (NIH) RCDC funding estimates for scientific research by category. The RCDC is a system that reports on the research grants, contracts and funds issued by the NIH. It gives scientists and other members of the public a way to see how the agency uses tax dollars to fund health projects and studies.
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