Request Quote
Untitled

Scientific Laboratory Equipment for Clinical, Industrial & Research Laboratories

Scientific Trends

 
  • Antibiotic-Resistant Super-Germs Beware: New Biotech Process Vastly Expedites Drug Research

    Antibiotic-Resistant Super-Germs Beware: New Biotech Process Vastly Expedites Drug Research ,

    Author:
    May
    11
    , DSS

    Researchers have developed a new platform to characterize and optimize sequences to make glycoproteins. The new technique, dubbed GlycoSCORES, uses mass spectrometry and cell-free protein synthesis. The result is much faster research into protein therapies that may defend against antibiotic-resistant supergerms. It would also accelerate research into other new drugs.
  • Quantitative Pharmacodynamic Assay Can Distinguish DNA Damage in Fixed Tumor Biopsies

    Quantitative Pharmacodynamic Assay Can Distinguish DNA Damage in Fixed Tumor Biopsies ,

    Author:
    Apr
    25
    , DSS

    Apoptosis, the natural death of cells, and cancer drugs can induce double strand breaks (DSBs) that lead to DNA damage. Current methods of identifying apoptosis involve microscopy and have restricted quantitative capabilities because of inadequate ratios between signals and noise. However, scientists at the National Cancer Institute's branches in Bethesda and Frederick, Maryland, have developed a process that uses immunofluorescence microscopy to analyze fixed tumor biopsy tissues. It can distinguish between DSBs that are induced by apoptosis and therapeutic treatments.
  • Scientists Develop New Medications in Much Less Time Using New Crystallographic Method

    Scientists Develop New Medications in Much Less Time Using New Crystallographic Method ,

    Author:
    Mar
    29
    , DSS

    Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a unique way to determine the crystal makeup of organic salts faster. Since salts make up about 40 percent of the active ingredients in medications, this new process can significantly accelerate the development of new pharmaceuticals. The new crystallographic method also decreases the effort that scientists put into that process which reduces development costs.
  • Engineering 3D Tissue - Controlling Complex Shapes In Vitro

    Engineering 3D Tissue - Controlling Complex Shapes In Vitro ,

    Author:
    Mar
    08
    , DSS

    As tissues develop, they fold, coil and ripple into complex shapes. After discovering more parallels between biology and technology, bioengineers at the University of California, San Francisco, found a relatively simple way to control tissue shapes in vitro. They can develop predetermined three-dimensional tissues by programming active mouse and human cells to extracellular matrix fibers.
 

View More