Recent News & Events

 
Oct
05
DSS

Cancer surgeons endeavor to remove all cancerous tissues from patients without removing the surrounding healthy tissue, but achieving that is more challenging than it sounds. To facilitate this goal, engineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a gentle, handheld mass spectrometry pen. In just seconds, it can accurately detect whether or not tissue is cancerous.

Benefits of Controlled Rate Freezing
Sep
27
DSS
The Controlled-Rate freezing process preserves cells at negative 112 or negative 321 degrees Fahrenheit. These ultra-low temperatures slow or stop biological activity. Controlling the freezing rate allows scientists to remove water from the cells and preserve them in a way that improves sample viability.
Scientists May Have Found a Way to Reverse Age-Related Hearing Loss
Sep
12
DSS
Based on mice research, scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital theorize that adults lose this ability because of a chemical in the brain. By restricting that chemical, they made auditory learning more efficient in adult mice. The research findings could lead to treatments that reverse age-related hearing loss in humans.
Cerebral Organoids May Help Scientists Better Understand Mental Impairments and Disorders
Aug
24
DSS
Scientists believe that cerebral organoids are the key to learning how the brain works and develops diseases. These clusters of tissue allow them to watch neurons grow and function in labs. This could change how they understand basic brain activity and the causes of brain impairments and disorders from autism to schizophrenia.
Vaccines Containing Genes Could Offer Advantages in Preventing Infectious Diseases
Aug
10
DSS
Vaccines for infectious diseases contain weak or dead proteins or pathogens from the disease-causing microorganisms. The vaccines that fight cancer rely on proteins as well. However, scientists have created a new type of vaccine that contains genes and is expected to offer several advantages over its standard predecessor. After decades of research, genomic vaccines are being used in clinical trials.
Membraneless Organelles Could Help Scientists Better Understand Incurable Diseases
Jul
25
DSS
Princeton University and Washington University engineers have collaborated to create a new way to study the material structure of membraneless organelles and observe how they work. Their research could have a myriad of scientific applications and help scientists better understand incurable diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS, Huntington's disease and cancers.
Is Patient Organoid Testing the Future of Prescription Medicine?
Jul
12
DSS
Researchers used Organoids to learn how the Zika virus affects developing brains. With that, and other successes they've had working with organoids, researchers believe that they can use organoids to determine whether or not a drug will work on a patient by patient basis. In the cases where this technology is being used in trials, several insurers have started covering expensive prescriptions that would have been denied otherwise.
Mycoplasma Contamination: The Problem and Prevention for Grant-Funded Research
Jun
29
DSS
Cell lines are important research tools, and contamination with microorganisms is one of the most common concerns. The cell lines need to be authentic to provide the most reliable results. This is why many grants require researchers to test cell lines for mycoplasma contamination.
Fruit Fly Study Finds That Gut Microbes Influence Food Choice and Behavior.
Jun
16
DSS
In a study of fruit flies, neuroscientists found that the gut microbiome communicates with the brain and influences food choices. The microbiome is a community of bacteria that's present in all animals, including humans. Many studies have shown that microbes affect health and biological pathways such as appetite and immunity.
Synthetic Bone Implant Produces Blood Cells and Improves Blood and Immune Disorder Research and Treatment
May
30
DSS
Patients with bone marrow diseases can get bone marrow transplants. However, this treatment method usually causes uncomfortable and damaging side effects such as fatigue, nausea and fertility loss. To improve the treatment of blood and immune disorders, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have engineered a synthetic bone implant that resembles real bone and produces healthy, functional blood.
No Batteries Required? Researchers Unveil Biological Supercapacitor That Powers Battery-Free Pacemakers With the Human Body
May
18
DSS

Technologies for medical implants continue to evolve at a fast pace. Pacemakers are one example of an implant that just keeps getting smaller. However, we still have to use traditional batteries to power them. This is why researchers have revealed a "biological supercapacitor" that uses the human body to power battery-free pacemakers and other medical implants that can potentially last a lifetime.

NIH Funding Estimates (Billions) for Research, Condition, and Disease Categories (RCDC)
Apr
25
DSS
Check out the 2017 National Institutes of Health (NIH) RCDC funding estimates for scientific research by category. The RCDC is a system that reports on the research grants, contracts and funds issued by the NIH. It gives scientists and other members of the public a way to see how the agency uses tax dollars to fund health projects and studies.
Series of NIH Commons Pilots Designed to Accelerate Scientific Discovery
Apr
13
DSS
The Commons is a shared virtual space where scientists can work with the digital objects of biomedical research, i.e. it is a system that will allow investigators to find, manage, share, use and reuse data, software, metadata and workflows. It will be a complex ecosystem and thus the realization of the Commons will require the use, further development and harmonization of several components.
When to Replace Your Centrifuge
Mar
31
DSS
In the life sciences, healthcare, or chemistry, an important type of equipment is the centrifuge. These precision machines, when properly operated and maintained, can last ten years or more. Although no organization is eager to spend money on replacement equipment, it will eventually become necessary.
Powdered Blood? Synthetic Blood Trials Show Promising Results
Mar
09
DSS
Blood transfusions save lives but blood isn't always available, especially in pre-hospital environments, because it requires refrigeration. Even with refrigeration, blood expires after 42 days, so you must routinely replace it. Scientists have researched the possibility of synthetic blood (also called artificial blood or blood surrogates) for years, and researchers at Ohio State University and Washington University in St. Louis may have found at least a temporary solution: powdered blood.
SEARCHBreast - Free - Online Database Shares Excess Tissue Samples to Aid Breast Cancer Research
Feb
23
DSS

SEARCHBreast is a tissue prototype database that that allows breast cancer researchers everywhere to share their in silico, in vitro and in vivo animal models so that other researchers can search for and use them. The benefits of SEARCHBreast are that it adds value to already funded research, makes new research projects cheaper and accelerates the entire process. For example, one genetic model for breast cancer could require a comprehensive breeding program to generate one mouse that has the necessary phenotype. This program may take up to 18 months to produce results, and it will be very expensive. With access to the necessary tissues through SEARCHBreast, the amount of time for the research drops to a matter of weeks, which considerably reduces the cost. Additionally, it removes the need for more testing animals.

These benefits have already manifested through SEARCHBreast since its launch in 2014. The tissue prototype database has assisted the sharing of hundreds of tissue samples. As a result, 400 animals were spared.

One Family's 'Curse' Provides a Better Understanding of the Human Genome
Feb
09
DSS
While studying a rare congenital deformity that's affected 10 extended family members, Dr. Stefan Mundlos and his team made new discoveries about the human genome. During DNA analysis, the team of scientists found a new class of genetic mutations that sheds light on many mysterious diseases and helps scientists better understand how genetic coding works.
Quantifying DNA, RNA and Protein - DeNovix Makes it Easy with Intuitive and Comprehensive EasyApps® Software for their Spectrophotometers & Fluorometers!
Jan
31
DSS

EasyApps® software for quantifying DNA, RNA and Protein was developed to work intuitively with the DeNovix line of Spectrophotometers and Fluorometers which are compact, stand-alone instruments.

Pre-configured Apps ensure optimized workflows while simple to use Custom Method Apps enable researchers to quickly create and save methods. DeNovix software provides a multitude of choices for reviewing and exporting results.

NABR Urges Everyone to Contact President Trump and Congress to Voice Support for Biomedical Research!
Jan
24
DSS - NABR

You can voice your support for biomedical research by sending a pre-written letter. The NABR provides the letter and sends it for you so it only takes a few minutes (click "read more" below for the link). Your voice matters! We urge everyone to take this opportunity to contact President Trump, Mike Pence - VP and Congress to request their support. This is a tiny investment of your time that will pay significant dividends in terms of educating policy makers about the irreplaceable value of humane animal research.

Frequently Asked Questions in Hypoxia Research
Jan
19
Wenger RH, Kurtcuoglu V, Scholz CC, Marti HH, Hoogewijs D
“What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level.
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